Stan VanDruff


Virginia, USA

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  • "Even with the lasers and touchscreen, the manly man in the video could not drill level into the wall. This Sears Craftsman, ca. 2002, which cost a lot less than CA$ 399, doesn't help with level but does solve the issue with plumb."
    on: A Gimmicky Drill With a Killer Feature: The Ability to Indicate Level or Plumb
  • "He is not using acrylic; you can clearly see that it is Borrex polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is strong, tough, scratch-resistant and impact-resistant. It is used in safety glasses, greenhouses, fighter jet canopies and bulletproof "glass." I doubt the builder has to worry about breakage, but it is heavy...and expensive."
    on: Guy Makes Transparent Bicycle Wheels
  • "I appreciate that you compared these tables to your restaurant experience. I recently judged turned objects for a local woodworking club with another woodworker and an artist. We woodworkers got lost discussing technical merit while the artist would just pick up a bowl and say "this makes me feel warm and happy" or "this reminds me of...," expanding our appreciation of the work. I apologize for veering from the premise of your original post, "trying to figure out why Moyer built various features into them" (commenter changing the subject, another shocker, eh?). But since you flattered me by asking for more, here goes...You say "we can try to guess what the function or purpose of various design elements is by studying them." I think we can also surmise a purpose from the way something is presented. These tables are displayed on equal footing with Moyer's other woodworking. They were photographed on white seamless and underwent Photoshop. I don't really think he intended to present the series as art (that was hyperbole on my part), but more likely "high craft." If I had seen photos of these in his shop, I think I would have had given them a warmer reception. What meets my standards? Look at Moyer's workshop chic side table: http://design-milk.com/workshop-chic-side-table-by-daniel-moyer/ (I couldn't find these particular photos on his website). Also made from bits and bobs of humble wood, this better fits my imagining of a restaurant server's experience. (Perhaps I give the cook too much credit?) This table includes foundational elements of the workshop tables (heavy top, robust legs, in-curved ankles, cross-grain feet), but with tight-fitting joints. The side table is filled with playfulness in the wild figure of the legs as well as the randomness of the wood selected for the top. But Moyer shows genius in book-matching the federally-inspired feet. The white stripe of table #2 also brings a sense of orderliness while providing stark relief for the black wing nut.Likewise, Moyer's prizedobject[dot]platform, http://www.danielmoyerdesign.com/prizedobjectdotplatform/ , uses all humble woods, showcasing a knotty walnut platform while surrounding it with an orderly rectilinear frame. The frame is also made of lighter walnut with random, but more subtle, figure that avoids pretentiousness sometimes found in similar objects.Back to shop furniture, here is Spike's house that Jimmy Diresta's made for his shop cat:  https://twitter.com/jimmydiresta/status/576539439746416641 , video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPttGrLqi0g. I don't consider Diresta a craftsman, but the end result is quite appealing, especially considering it is made from dowels with scraps of wood and MDF.As a final example, here is an outstanding (it makes me feel warm and happy) bench by Hank Gilpin: http://hankgilpin.com/wp-content/uploads/hank/furniture/american-elm-and-cherry-bench.jpg . For me this simple object hits all the right notes. The elm seat, though made of wood, looks soft, inviting, and comfortable; the swirling figure imitates fabric, while the end-grain curve enhances the pillow shape. Dovetails are executed perfectly in the cherry base. Elm and cherry hold a pleasant contrast as does the curved seat with straight legs.  This is a visually interesting form with consummate craftsmanship that would fit well within asian, shaker, contemporary or even mid-mod surroundings.7"
    on: Geeking Out Over Daniel Moyer's "Workshop Tables"
  • "Thanks for bringing this photo series to my attention. I found it interesting for a few minutes, but then I couldn't avoid the many ill-fitting joints or the low-grade wood that should have stayed in the dumpster. Even for shop furniture, why would a builder put so much time into decorative joinery while using such crappy wood. Was this the work of apprentices that failed to make the grade? Oh, I'm not really such a cynic, but these photos are displayed Prominently on Daniel Moyer's website as if they comprise art. This is neither art nor well-executed craft. Discussing the last photo of the sawbench, the author highlights a "chamfer" that is actually an artifact of bad photoshopping. You don't have to look very hard to see that everything on the top and left side of the photo (including saw handles, straight edges, and casters) have double images to the left of the real thing. The chamfer is just the double-image of the benchtop edge. And the casters on the clamp table are not really mismatched. Two are straight and 2 swivel, which is pretty common.2"
    on: Geeking Out Over Daniel Moyer's "Workshop Tables"
  • "I added a high-intensity under-bed light in order to irradiate dust bunnies that are the bane of all bed owners. Please hop into bed quickly to prevent sunburned feet. Update -- during prototype testing, I discovered that bright light is not conducive to human sleep. Version 2.0 will have an RGB mode, making the bed highly attractive for other purposes."
    on: The Weekly Design Roast, #10
  • "Correcting the Internet on proper usage of bevel/bezel while confusing the Internet on proper usage of bevel/chamfer...<sigh>. Both illustrations above are chamfers. Though laypeople may call every angled surface a bevel, woodworkers and masons know that an edge treatment bounded by two obtuse angles (commonly 135 degrees) is properly called a chamfer. A chamfer serves the same purposes as an external fillet. A bevel is used to form a sharp (acute angle) edge such as when making a miter/mitre or scarf joint, or a cutting tool such as an axe, knife or chisel."
    on: Design Terminology: What's the Difference Between a Bevel and a Bezel?
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