Nick Troll

Footwear Designer / Developer
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Favorites & Upvotes

  • 4 Favorited Articles

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  • 5 Comments
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Comments
  • "He may have exaggerated but his point remains the same. How easy is it to put it back in to it's "hidden" position? One would imagine it's not as easy as pulling it down. Do you have to take the hat off every time you're done with the mask? That would definitely have a negative impact on usability."
    on: Hide-a-Mask: On-Demand Face Mask That Pops Out of a Baseball Cap
  • "0 Advanced issue found▲️ Amazon had already invested huge money in Rivian (along with Ford)  before they placed the 100,000 vehicle order. So whether or not it's the best design, it seems like they may be the best ones poised to make waves in the market."
    on: Who's Got the Best-Looking Electric Delivery Van Design: Amazon, FedEx or UPS?
  • "Keep an open mind, guys. Innovation can't happen without thinking outside the box and trying to push the envelope, eh?I think the UA Architect might be a step in developing adaptive personalized training shoes. The lattice structure of the heel provides cushioning support but will bottom out with enough weight, as can be seen here: https://redshift.autodesk.com/3d-printed-shoes/ However; this could be turned into an advantage for athletes who move through various exercises during a workout. For example, you wouldn't want to wear the same shoes for your olympic lifts as you would for your warm-up run. A well cushioning running shoe is great for running but that cushioning leads to instability during a hang clean (Olympic lifting shoes actually have solid wooden heels to provide maximum stability) So if the UA Architect's heel could be engineered for specific weight ranges it could mean athletes may only need to buy one pair of training shoes. Bottoming out = solid foundation for olympic lifts and springy lattice = good cushioning for running.As for manufacturing and price: 1) Consumers (read athletes) already pay outrageous prices for "performance" footwear (Nike basketball shoes routinely cost $200, not to mention fashion footwear - just go shop at Nordstroms....) and 2) additive manufacturing processes and materials are constantly becoming more efficient and more reliable. It's only a matter of time until it becomes truly affordable/reasonable to use those methods for mass production.  "
    on: A Look at Under Armour's 3D ARCHITECHs, Spotted At Autodesk University
  • "I've bought multiple knockoff electronics products while in China for factory trips. I work in the shoe industry and know that (at least for shoes) the same factories make everything from top brands down to private label products. On the same production lines, 10 feet from each other. Of the knockoff electronics that I've purchased they are all almost identical to the true branded products. The only identifiable differences on the exterior of the products are usually spelling errors on easily swapped out injected pieces. I would not be at all surprised if factories were producing extra product with slightly lower quality interior parts while using the same molds and materials for the body. That being said, the knockoffs do perform well. I've never had a problem with them and am happy with the quality, not to mention the prices. On top of it all there are different quality of knockoff goods as people living in China know where to find the 'good' knockoffs. "
    on: Uh-Oh: Beats Teardown Apparently Used Beats Knockoffs
  • "I'd back it. It would be great to immortalize an invaluable part of American design history. "
    on: The Mid-Century Car Design Documentary We Were Never Meant to See
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