Scott Watrous


Montville, CT, USA

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  • "The sprues don't just enable the parts to be made in one shot. It also protects sometimes very delicate features from getting jostled around in the box, and to help in finding the parts during build by having part numbers on the runners. A loose bag of parts would be miserable for all involved.The cards are a fun idea. And cam be for more than model airplanes. I saw one for a paintball gun as a business card!"
    on: So, 3D Printing Sprue Cards for Model Airplane Kits is a Thing
  • "Because traditional carbon or fiberglass vac infusion takes time. This pressure molding method apparently cycles a lot faster than pulling vac. But overall it's just a refinement of the established process and parts should be mostly the same out of the mold."
    on: Nissan Figures Out How to More Affordably Mass Produce Carbon Fiber Parts
  • "I'm surprised busses wouldn't have rubber bellows under the pedals to prevent objects getting stuck under them. Or be designed with overlapping side ears  or a myriad of other simple, already proven methods of keeping foreign debris out. It's not like a significant increase in cost or complexity either."
    on: How a Commuter Thermos May Have Caused a Deadly Accident, Speeding the Vehicle Up and Preventing Braking  
  • "Modularity is certainly a thing but, what about this Mac Pro is modular in a way that differs from every non-Apple PC in the last 30+ years? You mention that on a PC you have to research compatible parts and find a screwdriver and install an aftermarket component. But that's if you bought a Dell from Best Buy and want to slap in a new graphics card. But that undersells what is actually a thriving market of computer component makers and houses, where you aren't replacing "quality name-brand stuff" with "crazy aftermaket upgrades" like some kid putting a fancy exhaust on his Corolla. Instead you have computers being built from the ground up with a tailored suite of components made by the various respected brands in the industry, by experienced builders. And then if you decided over time to upgrade there are upgrade paths whereby you can swap specific components without having to rebuild a whole new machine, and keep the bulk of your experience identical while enjoying more speed to keep up with new technology.The whole point of the PC is that it is made of compatible interfaces and standards. You pick and choose the specific motherboard you want. You choose a processor and graphics card based on the workflow you anticipate. You pick whether you need more or less cooling fans, or water-cooling loops. You can choose a minimalist case with minimal I/O and then later decide to upgrade to a nicer case with better cooling and ease of access and more I/O ports.  There are dozens and dozens of companies, in a massive industry, all making modules that manage to work together because there's a lot of money riding on the fact that they follow set standards to allow professionals to build a high-performance modular computing machine.Apple has simply been the closed garden monolith that said "we know the best configuration for our environment" and by and large that can be true. But the reality is that less and less can one configuration rule them all in high-end computing where you need niche hardware and lots of horsepower as we've tapped out our speeds per core. The fact that they are finally conceding that many professional users want flexibility to tailor their machines to their workflows, as was pointed out in the article, is just them avoiding becoming completely irrelevant to the true professional class that is worried about performance and bottom line more than what brand of computer they use. And does anyone think for a second that in 5 years when it's time to upgrade your CPU and Mobo that Apple will just sell that stuff and let you piecemeal upgrade while keeping your case, PSU, HDD, SSD, etc? No. They will try and pawn everyone off on a brand new tower whole-hog. Sure, that will be what most professionals need anyway, because no-one has time for the logistics of simply upgrading a bunch of machines, but it ultimately means that Apple could just as well offer simply a highly configurable base machine and let users buy exactly what hardware they need, which is already common for every single PC maker, A telling example for me is when Casey Neistat chose to ditch his beloved Apple and his R2D2 Mac Pro for a swanky custom-built PC, because Apple simply diddn't offer anything that could remotely do what he needed done. That all said, I do like the actual industrial design of new Mac Pro case. If Apple was just selling it as an fancy ATX chassis I could see people buying one for a regular PC build, because it's a slick piece of hardware. But ultimately you can get a really excellent, well designed, stylish PC case today for under $200 without even trying so, that's still not a huge selling point. "
    on: Is Modularity The Future of Product Design? Apple's Modular Mac Pro Reveals An Evolution to Workflow-centric Design Process
  • "Expect that in many regions it's still a good deal cold out. So either you have to work in a jacket or run the vehicle's heaters and thus engine for some amount of time, just idling away.  And many cars have poor insulation so it's not like your only having to run the heater every hour or so.But in another month or two this might not be as bad an issue most places."
    on: Working From Home, Spouse Driving You Nuts? Turn Your Car Into a Private Office
  • "Working from home means I'm more apt to actually go run errands during the day, actually go buy snacks or food I really want versus rely on the office mess. I'm more able to spend an hour getting a car wash at some point during the day from the local place, versus just ignoring it because the only times I'm driving is before sunrise or after sunset.I think the demands for many things aren't going to go away but the use patterns and schedules will shift. There will be some that do loose out but after a year of working from home my user of the local economy has not slowed down and I would expect most people to behave similarly."
    on: Twitter Says Employees Can Work From Home Permanently
  • "That's a neat link. Busting locks is more fascinating to me than picking them. But any aspiring bike thief could pretty quickly open that bottle and spray into it, and now dumping canned air onto the lock is much more efficient. Or simply run any sort of pocket knife along the bottle side to split it open and fall out of the way. If you're in for a pound carrying around a can of air and a hammer having literally any blade on you was probably the penny.In the meantime, there's always the Mighty Ramset Gun:https://youtu.be/Wimo09WV-rY"
    on: Urban Design Observations: What's Up With This Bike Lock?
  • "It looks like one would work stellar in a modernist BDSM dungeon. As long as it can be wiped down and sanitized. "
    on: Pommel Horse Seating to Encourage Office Chatting, Yea or Nay?
  • "https://youtu.be/ClPwlpa86bYEverone's favorite Uncle BumbleFaak did a basic overview of these last year"
    on: These Bolts Change Color When Tightened Properly
  • "It's not exactly falling into shadow. When the bolt is stretched under load the red insert dips into a dark inky dye that hides the indicator rapidly. If it was just shadow then different lighting conditions would totally defeat the indicator while with the dye method it should only marginally affect the result if you were to, say, shine a flashlight right at it. And by that same token there's a chance a green dye could be used, but it might not actually have the desired effect."
    on: These Bolts Change Color When Tightened Properly
  • "The other side of the coin is that design like this is an industry that allows creatives at the top of the game to continue playing. It's a game that is fed by addiction, but at least it inevitably fuels work being done on lower-end brands while also maintaining in employment those who for whatever reason really want to hone their craft to the level of quality to produce these items.I'll say that I don't resent the brands or these objects for existing as the market and place for them to exist is ultimately inevitable. It's more the culture and the addiction that drives women like this to keep purchasing more and more, long long past any sense of reason is maybe the more concerning aspect. "
    on: Hell in a Handbasket: "Bonkers Closets" is a Show Revealing How the 1% Store Their Luxury Goods
  • "It seems pretty obvious how having a tab on each of the four legs and then having them in the hairpin bent leg condition would turn the legs into essentially springs that would naturally allow for the wood to expand or contract. At first my assumption was that the natural spring tension of the metal was gripping the wood top until the text revealed tabs were indeed welded on (and that likely helps reinforce those butt joints so that makes sense) in any case its a simple form with some hidden benefits so I dog it "
    on: Manual's Stool Nº1 is a Modern Take on the Iconic Hairpin Design
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